Episode 134 – Free Book Zones, Walls of Content, and the Amazon Breakfast (with Honoree Corder)

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Question of the Week: Have you used visualization or other personal development tactics to achieve your goals? Why or why not?

Honoree Corder visited the show to talk about publishing, books, and the Amazon Breakfast! After thanking Honoree (and her book You Must Write a Book http://bit.ly/ymwabhc ), Craig Lea Gordon (and his book Hypercage https://amzn.com/B01KPGFQXY ) and Kirsten Oliphant (and her book Email Lists Made Easy for Writers and Bloggers https://amzn.com/B01HLLYCA4 ), the trio discussed tips on author training, creative visualization, and finding your ideal readers. News stories included a nonfiction NaNoWriMo, Free Book Zones, interactive YA entertainment, the “wall of content,” horror bleeding indies, and tips from the Amazon Breakfast. This week’s Question of the Week: Have you used visualization or other personal development tactics to achieve your goals? Why or why not?
What You’ll Learn:
  • What authors can learn from the latest Indie Author Fringe conference
  • How indie authors can use creative visualization to succeed
  • How authors can train Amazon to target reader profiles
  • How one company plans to set up Free Books Zones
  • How nonfiction authors can achieve writing goals in November
  • How an interactive entertainment company plans to bring YA books to life
  • Why one industry professional thinks the “wall of content” will squash indies
  • Why some horror writers are leaving traditional publishing to become indies
  • How the biggest authors in nonfiction get their books finished and out into the world
Links:
Question of the Week: Have you used visualization or other personal development tactics to achieve your goals? Why or why not?

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  • Always love when Honoree is on the show. Top notch guest.

    • Honoree Corder

      Thanks so much @facebook-100000653705454:disqus!

    • Bryan

      Likewise :).

  • Lavie Margolin

    Goals are helpful- I am not sure if it is visualized by goals got me to #1 in my niche on Amazon, a quote in the NY Times and the forthcoming review in Publishers Weekly.

  • Lavie Margolin

    Goals are helpful- I am not sure if it is visualized but goals got me to #1 in my niche on Amazon, a quote in the NY Times and the forthcoming review in Publishers Weekly.

    • Bryan

      You never know. Way to be :).

  • I ask myself if I’ll regret not doing this or that in the future. I know that one year from now, I’ll be so glad I wrote that book. I won’t regret missing a TV show, arguing with someone on Facebook, or sleeping in ’till noon.

    • Bryan

      Good mindset, Darren!

  • I focus on missing out, like how I invented the Constantly Variable Transmission and had the idea for Cowboys vs Aliens* decades ago and never acted on either.

    * mine was actually going to be good.

    • Bryan

      Aw, man!

  • I wanted to comment on one reason it takes Trad Publishing so freakin’ long to publish. They are focused on bookstores, and need to put the book in ‘the catalog’ so booksellers can plan for them waaaaay ahead of time. Publishers are reluctant to put a book in the catalog without it actually being done or almost a sure thing to be completed. Untested or unreliable authors can’t get quick turnaround because they won’t start the marketing process until the book is done.

    This catalog timeline, and other similar traditions, set the stage for a slow and relaxed pace.

    With our latest book we had to contribute our bios and book description almost 18 months before our book came out, then give a more ‘final’ version of the same info about 10 months out, after the book was done (on our end). We have a small press publisher who was willing to risk it because this is book #5, so they knew we could and would do it.

    Indies, on the other hand, don’t care if they are in the catalog because they aren’t going to be in the bookstores, anyway, and booksellers don’t even read the catalog. They just go to the items that the publisher’s reps tell them about and if they get a good sales pitch they might order some for some of the stores.

    • Bryan

      Damn that catalogue! Makes sense.

  • Zachary Marcum

    I think the utility of visualization and similar techniques depends on the execution. I can visualize myself being interviewed by Terry Gross, or laughing at my clever wit and personable charm as I deliver my groundbreaking TED talk, but unless I visualize myself finishing my next freakin’ chapter first, it’s a useless exercise.

    • Bryan

      Yeah, action always needs to be a part of this process.

  • I have yet to find a system that works for me. As to why, the closest I can get to explaining it is they all incorporate an unrealness that never solidifies into something I can get my head around.

    • Bryan

      I agree that there’s an unrealness in all of these, but I’ve found a way to ignore everything long enough to try each one once. Some have ended up being effective, so it was worth it for me.

  • Spider McGee

    No guru, no method, no teacher.

    • Bryan

      You tell ’em, Spider!

  • Bryan

    Nice work, RJ!

  • Jim used to say ‘How bad do you want it?’ (he said it a lot in earlier shows). When I’m working my butt every day in order to achieve my goals, I think about Jim’s saying and I respond to it; usually with the word ‘really,’ then a strong expletive, and then the word ‘bad.’

  • Laura Martone

    Spider might disagree with me, but I’ve definitely used personal development tactics to achieve my writing goals. Every day, in fact, I spend 5-10 minutes meditating and 10-20 minutes journaling, both of which have helped me to overcome my negative thinking, increase my productivity, and understand my characters better. Sometimes, before sitting down to write, I even meditate as one of my characters – and it really does work wonders to channel my character’s thoughts and improve his/her voice!

    • Bryan

      Meditating as a character?! That’s super cool.