Episode 13 – Jim’s Return To The Show

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For Jim’s return, we discussed how the big five publishers are using libraries to sell books and analytics to to tell an incomplete story.  Our tips included using author groups, Booktrack and Marketing Grader to strengthen your platform. We also talked about France’s “Anti-Amazon Law,” the traditional publishing version of Hugh Howey and the new indie authors involved in Amazon’s Kindle Worlds. Jim and Bryan finished off the program answering last week’s question and posing a new question on libraries selling books.
What You’ll Learn: 
  • How forming a team of authors can help sales
  • What sound effects will do to enhance your books
  • How to grade your website
  • Where you can start to buy books for the first time
  • The way France is protecting bookstores
  • What even the skewed numbers are saying about book sales
  • How traditionally published authors could add to the debate
  • Which indie worlds you can take a crack at Amazon
  • How Jim and Bryan are connecting with readers
Links: 
Question of the Week: 
If libraries began to sell ebooks would it result in a violation of public trust? Would the answer be different if it was your books being sold?

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  • Melissa AuClair

    Hi Jim & Bryan! Love the show; I’ve come to associate Wednesdays with Sell-more-books podcast day! Jim, I have a question. I’ve heard you mention a couple of times that a person who wants to be a consultant/speaker should try to publish with a publisher. What if I don’t want to wait that long? I’m working on the book that will be my foundation book for my speaking/consulting. Is a speaker/consultant hurting their trajectory by self publishing their book? (I think I know what you’ll say, but I’d love to hear you flesh it out.) Thank you for all the tips and highlighting the news. I’m better informed and becoming a better marketer because of your show 🙂

    • Currently still, a lot of event planners and people who book speakers still value a hard cover book more than they do a self published book. Nothing you or I can do to change how they feel. So yes, typically, a speaker with a hard cover book will be considered more often. But that doesn’t mean you can’t get booked without one. Just write a really awesome book. 🙂

      • Melissa AuClair

        Thank you Jim! I was wondering who the gatekeepers were. Thanks for the advice; I will write a great book!

        • disqus_IEdgLGcTVF

          Lightning Scource will let you print a hardcover, I believe.

          • Bryan

            True, Alyne. I think Jim is more talking about the speaker with the hardcover book in the book stores.

          • Melissa AuClair

            I’ve never looked into Lightening Source- I’ll keep that in my memory bank; thank you Alyne. Bryan, thanks for your input too- I will probably go with a soft cover with POD at the beginning and test that first.

  • Julie Farrell

    Hey Jim, I just pre-ordered Go Direct! I put the money in the tip jar so I could pay by Paypal – just in case that skews your stats! Lol! Can’t wait to read it! 🙂

  • All arts orgnaizations ask for support. Theatres, symphonies, operas, art museums, musicians, even authors oftne via academia. Shakespeare was supported by Elziabeth I and her court. That was why he moved to London.

    Novelists have had the most difficult time in this respect because of the solitary nature of the work. This is why publishers have had the power they’ve had, I think.
    By the way, Bryan, how do you choose the wuthors for your events? hint…
    Alyne de Winter

    • Bryan

      That makes a lot of sense, Alyne. It’s so great that novelists are finally getting out of the solitary mindset!

      Haha, I usually go hunting for folks after I choose a particular genre. Then I look at the best seller lists and reviews before I hunt down email addresses :). What’s your genre, Alyne?

      • My typos will become famous…It’s not because I can’t spell, but because I can’t type. lol!
        I write Gothic fantasy, thrillers, romances, all with supernatural elements—always atmospheric and Gothic.

        I have one book that sells pretty well and sells the other two and my shorter works. But I have yet to have a big seller as I’m laying low until I have a couple more books out. One is a series that I plan to push once the second book is finished. I have really good reviews though, when I can get them and a few strong fans. This is why the 6 year plan…. 🙂

        • Bryan

          Fantastic! Well, I’ll definitely keep you in mind if I do any events (or know of any) in those genres!

  • All arts orgnaizations ask for support. Theatres, symphonies, operas,
    art museums, musicians, even authors often via academia. Shakespeare
    was supported by Elziabeth I and her court. That was why he moved to
    London.Novelists have had the most difficult time in this respect
    because of the solitary nature of the work. This is why publishers have
    had the power they’ve had, I think.
    By the way, Bryan, how do you choose the wuthors for your events? hint…. 🙂

  • Gerad Forte

    Regarding the question of the week. I don’t think that libraries offering books for sale is a breach of the public trust. As long as no one is forcing anyone to buy books there, having the option shouldn’t effect the experience of the libraries customers at all.
    If, however, libraries start to get more entrepreneurial and start manipulating the way that they display books to enhance sales, or start making decisions about which books to offer based on the commercial potential, I think it could become an issue.

    • Bryan

      Great points, Gerad! The manipulation argument seems to almost exactly reflect the difference between Barnes and Noble’s website and Amazon’s. Amazon and libraries are all about letting people find what they want as soon as possible. Barnes & Noble and the hypothetical entrepreneurial libraries are beholden to the highest bidder.

  • I’m not usually a slippery slope guy, but in this case I think that commercializing the library could be a big one. They have a *lot* of private data, and a single breach could do massive damage to the public perception of what is our most important remaining public resources in this country. I understand that they’re struggling, but I have a hard time thinking that semi-privatizing them by making them commercial outlets for a captive audience is going to work out any better than it has for education.

    And Jim, I just pre-ordered the book. I can’t wait to read it! Feel free to let me know how I can help boost the signal.

    • Thanks for ordering! And listening!

    • Bryan

      Good points, good points.